Why we teach from the Bible in every sermon

Why we teach from the Bible in every sermon

The Bible is the best-selling book of all times. It is read, respected, revered, and reviled by people from every nation. Each Sunday, the stories, teachings, and history as recorded in this collection of ancient writings shapes not only the preaching, but the entire worship services of millions of churches. From the lyrics we sing to the creeds we believe; the Bible is the central source of authority for the church’s faith and practice. In week two of Because, Gary looks at the Bible and explains why we use it and how we often abuse it.

You, however, know all about my teaching, my way of life, my purpose, faith, patience, love, endurance, persecutions, sufferings—what kinds of things happened to me in Antioch, Iconium and Lystra, the persecutions I endured. Yet the Lord rescued me from all of them.The prophet Isaiah was speaking about John when he said,

In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evildoers and impostors will go from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived. 

But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have become convinced of, because you know those from whom you learned it, and how from infancy you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. 

All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:10-16 (NIV)

The Bible is . . .

Collaborative
Opposite: Individualistic; Perversion: Combative

Useful
Opposite: Useless; Perversion: Idolized

Sufficient
Opposite: Insufficient; Perversion: Exhaustive

Questions to Consider . . .

To those who honor and revere the Bible:

  1. Are you hearing the living, breathing Word of God or are you studying ancient literature?
  2. Do you use the Bible as a mirror or a sword?
  3. Is the Word becoming flesh in you? If not, can you really say you believe it?

To those who have dismissed the Bible or not seriously considered its teachings:

  1. Before you dismiss the Bible because of what some college professor told you, have you read it for yourself? Thoroughly?
  2. If there is a possibility that God exists, and if there is a possibility that He has left a written account of Himself, isn’t it worth reading?

Suggested Resources:

Books:

Eat This Book, Eugene Peterson
The Pursuit of God, A.W. Tozer